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The Hum Map 3.0 is now online

Follow World Hum Map and Database Project on WordPress.com
Follow World Hum Map and Database Project on WordPress.com

www.thehum.info

Finally, we have a data set with construct validity and with significantly reduced confounding factors. Once we crossed the threshold of roughly 17 000 map entries, we then applied a very strict set of criteria to filter the raw information, resulting in just over 3000 high-quality entries to the database and World Hum Map. If you are experienced in statistical techniques, then feel free to download the database, and let me know what you learn.

One risk of applying stringent criteria for map inclusion is that there will be people who feel excluded, marginalized, or that we don’t believe them. Nothing could be further from the truth. One important result of our project is the realization that not only is the world awash in unwanted and nuisance low-frequency sound and infrasound but also that many of these sounds share many characteristics with the World Hum.  In some cases, it can take considerable effort to separate the two and to track down exactly what is causing the disturbance in question. Here is your guide for doing that.

On this last day of 2019, I admit to a sense of disappointment that I cannot devote more time to this project. I am also grateful that we have Henrik, one of our resident scientists, and Jason Lewis, our volunteer programmer, who have both done heavy lifting to help bring the 3.0 Hum Map to fruition.

Slowly but surely we move toward the solution to this mystery. Just a few days ago, I chuckled out loud when, later at night, I heard that familiar distant idling engine noise and said to myself,  “I wonder what that sound is?”. As long as I and others never lose that sense of scientific mystery and discovery, we will get to the bottom of it.

Glen

 


16 Comments

  1. Olga Seminutin says:

    Thanks Glen, Its great to see that people of your intellect and skills are interested and are trying to help! What I can say with my experience with it is that sometimes its very loud inside (20-34 Db) and sometimes I cant hear it at all. Ive not heard it for about 2 months now, and its been a great relief! When it was louder I could feel the sound like a pressure in my head, like it was underwater. I thought due to the particular qualities the sound had, almost louder when I put earplugs in, indoors etc, that it may have been coming from underground..I know is that rational? Who knows..

  2. Steve Kiley says:

    Thank you for your continued work in trying to understand this phenomenon.
    For me, it is still the same as ever, a hum which lasts for anything from 5 to 30 seconds, then switches off for a few seconds before starting again. It is always indoors though, even when in a very well insulated room at a hospital.

  3. Kurt says:

    I have to say, I am grateful for your commitment Glen 🇩🇰❤️

  4. Daniel Young says:

    I am now hearing the low diesel hum sound again. it started last night at 330am here in victorville. it was gone for over a year and now it is back. it sounds like it is right outside of my right ear as if it is directed at me. this sound is real and it is bad

    • Olga says:

      Im sorry to hear that. .about 2 mnths ago it was doing that to me. I downloaded a free decibel measuring app and started measuring the range each morning and stating the range of noise for that day and commenting on it. After about 2 wks of this I noticed it was reducing until it left. Not sure if this is why but its worth a try..

    • BGM says:

      Have you tried playing white noise? There’s a video on Youtube of 10 hours of white noise. I gave it a try when I last heard the hum (also the “diesel” variety), gradually easing the volume up, and it blocked the hum at quite a low volume. White noise seems to cancel out the hum frequency, for me anyway. Hope it works for you.

  5. Steve Kohlhase says:

    Glen. Keep up the good work that will make a difference in resolving this matter. Steve Kohlhase

  6. Vendi says:

    I have been hearing the low frequency sound for over 6 months. I lived in a country side where is a silence and the sound was very powerful. Fortunately, I was able to move to a capital, and live now beside very noisy street. However, the sound is still there but I must say I am getting used to it and noise of traffic helps a lot. These are my discoveries: I am driving every week day to work to a different city and during week I can not hear the sound at all. Only when I stay at home for more than 2 days, I start hearing it. Also when I travel to a foreign country, the sound comes only after 2 to 3 days. I am really start believing that our brains are the source of the sound. Brains consist of neurons and produce electric signals. Being at home inside walls for more than a day or two, same neurons are activated most of the time and it might take a time for neurons to reach a threshold for the sound. Plus it might be that a steel inside walls (concrete) interfere with brains. I guess many theories. Unfortunately are brains still a big mystery of humankind, therefore might take time before resolving the worldwide hum mystery.

    • Olga says:

      Interesting theory, but our brains are all pretty much built the same way, so why do less than 5% of hear it only?

      • Vendi says:

        Olga, we are very much similar to each other, but due to mutations in genes differences such as height, eyes color and also brains structure (number of neuron connection…) exist among living beings. As I said brains are very much still a mystery to humankind, therefore I believe many unresolved problems might with better knowledge of brains become resolved.

    • Hi Vendi – Excellent report.

      From the clues you relate in your comments we guess that most likely you ARE hearing the traditional HUM (an internally sourced “perception” – not a real acoustic sound). For a “checklist” of evidence, please see my “webnote”:

      http://electronotes.netfirms.com/ENWN53.pdf

      It would be interesting to learn how many of the eight items there apply to you.

      Since relatively few people commenting here make reports regarding item (8), [HUM stops for several days due to travel] your observation is quite intriguing. I assume your travel to a different country may be by air? And does your weekday road travel to work involve any elevation changes of, say, 500 feet or greater? [The issue here is cycling of pressure changes in the middle ear.]

      Thanks – Bernie

  7. Vendi says:

    Hi Bernie. Thank you for a comment. I am driving to work to a different city every week day by a car. It might be that I am not able to hear the hum during a week due to a nosy street besides my apartment plus I noticed that when my body is in a bit of stress, not fully relaxed probability of hearing the hum is lower. However, whenever I go to a country side where is incredibly peaceful I am almost always able to hear the hum. You see my theory is following: many people reported that when they travel abroad, the hum reappears only after two to three days. My assumption is that when we travel abroad our body, brains come to a new, different environment (as well few other neurons are activated) , where at first neither body nor brains feel completely relaxed. After two days both start getting used to a new environment, start getting more relaxed (similar map of neurons to those at home starts getting activated) and the hum appears. I have no explanation why and how. This is just my thinking.

    • Thanks Vendi –

      You did not say if your road travel was through mountains. Also you did not report on whether or not you tried the other items on my (easy) “checklist”.

      Rather than speculate on body/brain/neuronal encounters with changing environments, is it not more useful to FIRST gather and report standard evidence – particularly as such tests are free and easy?

      Bernie

      • Vendi says:

        Hi Bernie. I can relate to all eight items written on your checklist. Vendi

      • Vendi – Outstanding – Thanks

        You seem to be almost certainly a traditional hearer. In heading my checklist as “Encountering The Typical Hum – Tests You Are Better Off Failing” I was alluding to the “traditional HUM” as an affliction rather than as a talent! So – irrespective of whether you are owed praise or sympathy, you are a least a good solid data point.

        Please continue submitting any additional solid observations.

        Bernie

  8. Vendi says:

    Bernie, I don’t travel through mountains, no height difference.

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