Home » Uncategorized » Preparing for the next major experiment…

Preparing for the next major experiment…

Follow World Hum Map and Database Project on WordPress.com
Follow World Hum Map and Database Project on WordPress.com

I received an email recently reminding me that there is an important and simple experiment waiting to be replicated and confirmed. If the experiment is a success, then in my view this will be a major step forward.

There are sketchy anecdotal reports of people who have descended deep into limestone caves and successfully escaped the Hum. I may have the chance to test this more conclusively, with a group of regional volunteers. There is a famous old mine just north of Vancouver, now used for educational purposes. A few years ago, I entered into initial conversations about the mine being used as a crucial setting for an important scientific experiment. I drifted back toward finishing the Deming Box instead, but now I think it’s time to start getting ready to look in other directions. I’ll be reaching out to them again soon, and I hope the added weight of many serious and mainstream news articles will encourage their participation.

Later one night, a group of volunteers who hear the Hum would gather near the mine and, indoors with the mains electricity turned off, listen if they hear the Hum. Then we would descend to the deepest parts of the mine and again have the mains power shut down. (This is the part that I am going to have to work very hard to convince them of). Then we would listen again.

If the Hum were blocked, this would be a major discovery, and would at once point the research in specific directions.


11 Comments

  1. Note: if I do call for regional volunteers (i.e. Lower Mainland of Vancouver and Vancouver Island), do note that air travel will typically disrupt the Hum for up to four days. Long road travel can sometimes disrupt the Hum for up to one day.

    • Glen –

      Interesting – I did not know that, but it is easy to believe that air travel (meaning, ear popping, etc., due to pressure changes) would disrupt normal Hum hearing. I suppose a long road trip could be similar in involving occasional pops on hills, as is a common experience. Clearly a VERTICAL shaft as deep as 600 meters would be a possibly confounding factor with regard to pressure changes. (Any safe abandoned HORIZONTAL tunnels?) This would be particularly true if it turns out that the source of the Hum is situated in the middle ear that is so involved with pressure imbalances.

      Extra clues here?

      Bernie

      • You may be interested in knowing that it has been established that air travel also disrupts otoacoustic emissions – also for several days. One serious paper argues that the Hum and Otoacoustic emissions may arise out of the same mechanism: http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/95335020/hum-otoacoustic-emissions-may-arise-out-same-mechanisms

      • And if it can be shown that the Hum is blocked deep in a mine, otacoustic emissions can be ruled out (your concern about pressure changes notwithstanding).

      • True – the key being that it needs to be well-established that the CAUSE of the Hum is actually BLOCKED, as opposed to being DISABLED (for example, by the bellowing of the eardrum against the middle-ear mechanisms). Have you figured out how to make that distinction?

      • By “bellowing” are you referring to pressure changes in the middle ear disabling the Hum? It sounds like that might be a separate, and fruitful line of inquiry, which we can do quite easily without any special equipment or setting. It also occurs to me that if we can get access to a world-class anechoic chamber reasonably far away from busy human activity, we could run a closely related test to the mine idea, but without any concerns about pressure. Needless to say, any result is important – negative or positive, as long as the test is conducted properly.

      • Glen – you asked:

        “ By “bellowing” are you referring to pressure changes in the middle ear disabling the Hum?”

        Sure am. I wrote up a note a month ago which I sent to a couple of people but felt was too speculative to post officially. That said, here it is now:

        http://electronotes.netfirms.com/ITH.pdf

        and here is a good graphic reference on the protective mechanisms of the middle ear.

        http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/sound/protect.html

        You also said:

        “It also occurs to me that if we can get access to a world-class anechoic chamber reasonably far away from busy human activity, we could run a closely related test to the mine idea, but without any concerns about pressure.”

        Yes, but I think you want an acoustically insulated room (insulation on the outside) not an anechoic chamber (insulation on the inside). I’ve been in an anechoic chamber and it’s very disconcerting.

        You also said:

        “Needless to say, any result is important – negative or positive, as long as the test is conducted properly.”

        Absolutely that. Witness Michelson-Morley for Einstein’s Special Relativity, and Bohr famously said “How wonderful that we have met with a paradox. Now we have some hope of making progress” and the late-great scientist, gadfly, and polymath Tommy Gold who had outlandish theories, with about half RIGHT, (pulsars – yes, moon dust – no, active tuning of inner ear – yes, abiotic oil – still t.b.d.) who said that the greatest feeling was having a pet theory proved right, the second greatest was having it proven wrong, so you could stop wasting time, and the worst feeling was having it stuck in limbo.

  2. Rob Davies says:

    We have caves on our property in Golden Bay, New Zealand. They go very far into the marble of Takaka Hill but during a recent period when the local Hum was very load the caves were flooded after just 100m or so. By this point, they are 30m below the surface. In my little experiment, at that location, the Hum was unchanged compared to inside our home. In summer, there is the chance to go much deeper without diving. If the Hum returns then, I will see what happens. I would expect low-frequency sound to penetrate quite far and cavers often report hearing the verifiable drone of aircraft etc from quite deep underground.

  3. Melissa Padgett says:

    Thanks Glen for your continued research. I hope you’re videotaping these events; it will make a wonderful documentary!

    Your comment about the affect that air and long road trips have is fascinating. The only two consistent “Can’t hear the Hum” actions that work for me are 1) quickly shaking my head back and forth, and 2) putting my ears completely under water.

    I hope you’ll consider some experiments with the latter some time as well.

  4. But you travel on a magnetic field ( the terestrial magnetique field) and passes a lot of artificial magnetique fields… could calibrate this a stop of hesring the hum..

    could it be that the origin of hum… ? the magnetique terrestrial field???
    please take a magnetometer with you…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: