Home » Uncategorized » Hum hearers in Northern California

Hum hearers in Northern California

Follow World Hum Map and Database Project on WordPress.com
Follow World Hum Map and Database Project on WordPress.com

Zach St. George is developing a piece for Nautilus Magazine, and he would like very much to hear from hearers in Northern California. Please contact me if you would like to be put in touch with him and have your voice heard.


36 Comments

  1. Melissa says:

    If he considers SF Bay Area as northern CA, I’d be happy to contribute…

  2. David Sands says:

    In southern Oregon – close enough. The hum is caused by the acoustic packeting of high spin electrons. You’ll notice that the sound diminishes while taking a shower and comes back after the moisture in the air has dissipated. The electrical industry noticed
    and irritating sound produced by their high frequency circuits (GHZ). They had found the electrons magnetic resonance. It is being used as a weapon now, for neural acoustic entrainment (mass social mind control) and if locally and intensely targeted used to exhaust the autonomic nervous system. The victims end up dying in their sleep because of heart failure or they just stop breathing.
    Just thought you should know. David

  3. yewie56 says:

    Sorry, but it is very well known, that white or pink noise diminishes the hearing of lower frequencies.
    And what can you hear, when you have a shower?
    White or pink noise!
    Greetings from Germany

    • David Sands says:

      That’s right Yewie you turn the shower off. A very interesting publication from back in the mid 1970’s “The Book of Knowledge – The Keys of Enoch (J.J.Hurtak) mentions that in the near future (from 1975) high frequency sound (and its lower harmonics) will be used as a tool for mass social conditioning. It’s not just dogs and cats that hear a fuller band of sounds but humans do also but are unaware of it. Neural PET scans show central nervous system stimulation with sounds up to 40,000 hertz.
      – David

  4. John says:

    I am in Sacramento CA.

  5. Zach St G says:

    Hi John, please email me at zachstg@gmail.com if you’d be interested in talking. Thanks! – Zach

  6. frank rizzo says:

    I know this is a little off topic, but there is an experiment that people in South western North Carolina could do. That area of the country is mountainous and has caves. At night, when the hum is bad, if one of the sufferers could go out into the woods and into a cave they know of to see if they can hear it in the cave. The question would be, can the thick “walls” of a deep cave keep the hum out? Is it quiet in there or not? I live in Florida so I cant do it unfortunately. I dug a tunnel in my backyard. It took a few days to accomplish. I went in there at night and yes, I could still hear the hum. But I only had 2 to 3 feet of dirt above my head. A cave on the other hand, would have rock and much more dirt above one’s head. This hum is aweful.

    • David says:

      Mr. Rizzo –
      There are many sounds out there but I believe we are talking about the same one. This constant high frequency pitch or hum is caused by the free electrons in the air. It is local and seems to be coming from everywhere. The excited electrons (because of a band of microwave resonant frequencies) has a process of bunching or packeting together which creates the hum or annoying sound. I found an unexplained acoustic sound spike at around 16,400 hertz early on and realized that it was acoustic but caused electromagnetically. About the only thing that attenuates it is water. Next time you go swimming under water you’ll find the sound has dissipated.

      • Melissa says:

        David, I’m thrilled to see your post about not hearing the Hum under water. For over 2 years I’ve asked others who hear the Hum to test what I have experienced, which is that I don’t hear the Hum under water, while I do hear all manner of other sounds. Ian on this site posted he DID hear the Hum underwater. I think this is worth perusing and hope others will perform this quick and easy test and report in. Thank you!

      • Frank Rizzo says:

        There are many sounds out there but I believe we are talking about the same one. This constant high frequency pitch or hum is caused by the free electrons in the air. It is local and seems to be coming from everywhere. The excited electrons (because of a band of microwave resonant frequencies) has a process of bunching or packeting together which creates the hum or annoying sound. I found an unexplained acoustic sound spike at around 16,400 hertz early on and realized that it was acoustic but caused electromagnetically. About the only thing that attenuates it is water. Next time you go swimming under water you’ll find the sound has dissipated.

        David, you are a genius. I dont know how you got this information, but its true. You have finally helped me to find the solution to this hum that I have been dealing with since about 2013 or so. I filled my bathtub with water and put my head under water. My whole body and even my whole head did not need to be submerged. I would put my head up and down to hear the difference. It was during these experiments that I found out that I am hearing the hum in only one of my ears. This is strange but seems to be the case. I then got out and filled a Styrofoam bowl and put that one ear into it. Again, it stopped the hum. All I needed was one ear in the bowl. When I would lift my ear out of the water, the hum was there. I have come to the conclusion (using this one experiment) that having my ear in a bowl of water stops the hum. Later today I will go out and buy a water pillow. I think they sell things like this at Walgreens. My next experiment will be to see if resting that ear on the water pillow stops the hum. I will post my results as soon as I can. (I cannot sleep with my head in a bowl). Building a metal box or digging a tunnel will not stop the hum because the noise itself is being generated in the air around us. The noise is everywhere AND ALSO STEMS FROM EVERYWHERE, NOT A DISTANT LOCATION.

    • David says:

      I wanted to add that when the inner ear is in a constant state of stimulation it may take some time for the neural response to relax to where you don’t here the stimulated sound anymore (tinnitus – particularly at higher frequencies).

  7. frank rizzo says:

    I read it wrong; California, not Carolina. Whatever; they both have caves. There is something I want to add about my tunnel experiment: It was a complete failure. The hum was LOUDER inside the tunnel than it was when I was out and standing on the grass. This was a result I was surprised to find. I assume the hum went through the ground. But in a real cave one would have much more mass above their head.

  8. Melissa says:

    Zach: I read Zach’s articles, asked him a bunch of questions and decided he had good intentions and writing skills, so he interviewed me over phone last week. I was happy for the opportunity to tell my story to a good listener. I’ve come to accept the experience so completely that I forget how unusual it must seem to someone new to it, which came back to me while were speaking. I hope his plans for an article go through.
    Caves: I think it’s a great idea to experiment, so that those of us who don’t have the scientific background to analyze frequencies etc. can still add–even only anecdotally–to the body of knowledge. I’m still waiting to hear if anyone else has tried hearing the Hum while underwater. I don’t hear it. Do you?
    White noise: Speaking of experiments, I was forced into one over the last 2 nights. For 3 years I’ve listened to white noise through an ear bud in my left ear at night. I’d come to believe this is the only way I can maintain my sanity and get some sleep. I even told Zach, “I literally don’t know what I’d do if I wasn’t able to use the white noise.” Well, now I know. My cell phone battery ran down and the charger stopped working and for reasons no need to describe, I wasn’t able to go get a new charger for 2 nights. So there I was, in the worse situation I could imagine re: the Hum. Out of desperation I put the ear bud in my ear anyway (having determined early on that NO ear buds or covers work to block it), and almost convinced myself I could still hear the white noise. While the Hum was loud and clear, I was able to fall asleep–albeit restlessly–both nights. So I survived that particular trial, but TODAY I’ll get a new cell phone charger. No need to suffer.

  9. Tracie Thomas says:

    Not in California but would love to know results On Mar 7, 2016 3:59 PM, “World Hum Map and Database Project” wrote:

    > Dr. Glen MacPherson posted: “Zach St. George is developing a piece for > Nautilus Magazine, and he would like very much to hear from hearers in > Northern California. Please contact me if you would like to be put in touch > with him and have your voice heard.” >

  10. Melissa says:

    Ian, thank you for letting me know! That’s exactly what I meant. I don’t hear it while submerged in the bath, so am interested that you do.

  11. Jody says:

    Here in Angels Camp, CA in the Sierra Foothills we have heard, and sometimes felt, the hum for the last 2 1/2 years. Originally was sporadic, but now occurs daily. Starts and ends rather abruptly.

    Always astonishing to me is the fact not everyone can hear it. Read a couple of years ago carbon nanotubes are being sprayed in chemtrails, and are added to vaccinations. One report was by a group of medical doctors who had written to the FDA requesting an explanation of why they were added, but they got no response. In another article on nanoparticles a scientist suggested nanotubes can be used to transmit sounds.

    As crazy as this sounds, I’m wondering if there is a connection, and this being why some may hear it while others don’t. Can anyone shed any light on this? I know hypersonic sound can be directed to targeted individuals.

  12. nukya says:

    I had heard the hum frequently in the 95130 zip code several years ago. I first noticed it after super insulating my house and upgrading to double-pane windows. The sounds would go away the moment I would crack open a window and come back when I’d close it.

    I had then moved and was hum free until I lived in 95008 in a modern house briefly that had lots of insulation and double-pain windows.

    I moved to 95120 and was hum free for 3 years. However I have recently started hearing it again after doing a major remodel with insulation and double pain (and triple pain) windows.

    I have a theory that there’s some sort of sub-sonic (or infrasonic) acoustic energy that permeates the bay area from time to time (root cause I have no idea) and somehow the diaphram of the double pane windows combined with the pneumatic cavity of a house is modulating or resonating that energy into a low humming noise.

    • It seems significant that you associate the Hum with buildings that are or have been better insulated. Presumably you are talking about thermal insulation, but a significant measure of acoustic isolation (like fiberglass) would be expected. Inside such an (inadvertently) acoustically insulated (quiet) structure. In such cases, you would be more likely to hear the Hum rather than otherwise.

      You also say the sound goes away when you “crack open a window”. Is this what happens when you stand NEAR to the open window crack, or is the open window in another room altogether? And – how quiet is it outside in such cases?. Even a small amount of environmental noise (heard outside, or through an open window) easily masks the Hum (for me at least).

      • nukeya says:

        It was thermal insulation, however, it also attenuates high-frequency sound.

        The deadening seemed to happen when I’d crack open a window and persisted even fairly far away although I’m working from memory now. I’ll try it again the next time I hear the hum.

      • nukeya says:

        To further elaborate, I couldn’t alter the tone noticeably by touching or “damping” the window pane itself. But I wanted to try to get more sophisticated about it. Until recently there was a lot more (normal causes) ambient night noise so I forgot about the hum until last night.

  13. Ben says:

    I am In sacramento and want to meet a fellow hummer and get together and see if we are hearing the same thing at the same time. I see all these posts are old.so have little hope in this website….1/12/17..

    • James says:

      Hello I have been Hearing a low frequency hum here in west Sacramento for a couple months now maybe longer and is now increasing to all day and all night only.stopping for a few hours. It would be awesome to check our sources and see if they are the same. I lived in west Sacramento for 30 years before I moved to OC. I have extremely good hearing and know this area like the back of my hand so I know 100% something is going on

  14. Suzan Gonzalez says:

    I would like to know how/who to connect with a hummer’s group. I live in So. California, 91786. I have been annoyed by the loud, low pitch constant hum now for many years. I used to keep me awake, many times I have gone outside looking for whatever was hovering over the house making that noise. It is kind of like putting a big tight fitting sea shell against each ear. Even though a cup or glass does not do that trick. I am left handed, if that means anything. I have asked many people to verify the sound, ‘Don’t you hear that sound?’, but I have never encountered anyone else who hears it also. My mother was hard of hearing (low frequency loss); but could never hear the hum. I too have low frequency loss; but I still hear the hum. Because of my hearing loss, the hum enterfears with the quality of hearing some low frequency sounds. I try to live with the background or should I say, overhead hum, by ignoring it. Since no one else hears it. I don’t know what to do about it or how to stop it. But it is there. Constantly.

  15. Suzan Gonzalez says:

    I said constantly. It does go away at times. But for the majority of the time it is there. I do have a friend who hears like electricity crackling, rather than the hum. I have always called it a roar rather than a hum.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: